An Introduction to the Smart Client Software Factory and Composite Application Block: Part 2 WorkItems

Introduction In part 1 of this article I introduced a simple example of how to use Microsoft’s Composite Application Block. To try to keep the example as simple as possible I only covered modules and shells. There are two other core concepts that you need to understand to be able to use even the most … Continue reading An Introduction to the Smart Client Software Factory and Composite Application Block: Part 2 WorkItems

An Introduction to the Smart Client Software Factory and Composite Application Block: Part 1 Modules and Shells

Introduction Microsoft’s Smart Client Software Factory (SCSF) and associated application blocks are excellent pieces of software. However, for a developer coming to them for the first time they can be extremely daunting. There are many things that can be confusing. Firstly we have modules, workitems, workspaces, and shells, all of which sound similar. Then there’s … Continue reading An Introduction to the Smart Client Software Factory and Composite Application Block: Part 1 Modules and Shells

C#, Visual Basic and C++ .NET Line Counter Utility – Version 2

Downloads Source code download. Executable download. Update An updated version of the line count utility described in an earlier article is now available. This now: Does basic C++ line counting of Visual Studio.NET projects and solutions, as well as C# and VB.NET as previously. Counts the total number of code files and displays them in … Continue reading C#, Visual Basic and C++ .NET Line Counter Utility – Version 2

C# and VB.NET Line Count Utility – Version 1

This program has now been upgraded to version 2, which additionally deals with C++ .NET solutions. This can be downloaded from my later article. Overview The attached program is a line count utility written in C#. This: Counts the number of lines in a .NET solution, project or individual code file. Works with both C# … Continue reading C# and VB.NET Line Count Utility – Version 1

Using HSL Color (Hue, Saturation, Luminosity) to Create Better-Looking GUIs (Part 4)

Continued from part 3. Code Listing The code for this article is available here. It includes the full listing for the HSLColor class discussed in the article. The project has a treeview that lets you select the various colors within the color scheme. It also has the three color schemes described in this article available … Continue reading Using HSL Color (Hue, Saturation, Luminosity) to Create Better-Looking GUIs (Part 4)

Using HSL Color (Hue, Saturation, Luminosity) to Create Better-Looking GUIs (Part 3)

Continued from part 2 Part 1 and part 2 of this article discussed the hue, saturation, luminosity color model, and created a class, HSLColor, that allowed colors specified using this model to be used in place of the more usual System.Drawing.Color class. Uses of Hue, Saturation, Luminosity So why is the hue, saturation, luminosity color … Continue reading Using HSL Color (Hue, Saturation, Luminosity) to Create Better-Looking GUIs (Part 3)

Using HSL Color (Hue, Saturation, Luminosity) to Create Better-Looking GUIs (Part 2)

Continued from Part 1. .NET Framework Support for HSL Microsoft gives some support for the HSL color in the .NET Framework. The standard color dialog lets us enter HSL values in the ‘Hue’, ‘Sat’ and ‘Lum’ boxes to the left of the Red, Green, Blue boxes. These can only be entered as integers, and are … Continue reading Using HSL Color (Hue, Saturation, Luminosity) to Create Better-Looking GUIs (Part 2)

Using HSL Color (Hue, Saturation, Luminosity) to Create Better-Looking GUIs (Part 1)

Introduction Business applications often have multiple screens that simply present grids of data. One way of making these applications more user-friendly is to use different colors on the backgrounds for such screens. Then you can talk about the ‘blue screen’ rather than the ‘intra-day warehousing report screen’. However, if you are not careful with your … Continue reading Using HSL Color (Hue, Saturation, Luminosity) to Create Better-Looking GUIs (Part 1)

Reasons Not to Use TableAdapters in .NET 2.0

Introduction We have decided to ban the use of TableAdapters on our project for the time being. This is because there is no way that we can see of doing centralized connection management using them. Every TableAdapter is capable of creating its own new Connection object. There’s no easy way of overriding that so that … Continue reading Reasons Not to Use TableAdapters in .NET 2.0

A Beginner’s Guide to calling a .NET Framework Library from Excel

Introduction It’s fairly straightforward to call a .NET Framework library directly from Excel on Windows, particularly if you are using Visual Studio.  You don’t need Visual Studio Tools for Office.  However there doesn’t seem to be an easy guide on the internet anywhere. The Microsoft documentation is quite good on the subject, but can be … Continue reading A Beginner’s Guide to calling a .NET Framework Library from Excel